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Archive for the ‘injury, accident’ Category

Jim Mc Aninch, TFT-ADV, TFT-RCT and Tom Greenhalgh made a presentation about clearing issues which troubled Veterans, Public Safety and Addicts in their struggles with recovery, entitled “They don’t Talk, Trust or Feel”. 

911 dispatchers are a unique group, for they are the first responders. They are the first ones to connect with the individuals or groups with an emergency need. They must take the information, figure out the need and then relay that information to the proper responders with the correct location in seconds.  There is no room for error for they are dealing with life and death situations. Like the military and their special operation individuals; they are a challenging group to gain entry into.

With the development of CISM procedure and CISM teams working with the various responder groups, the value of this to the members was being recognized. Unfortunately the dispatchers we’re not included in these groups because they were not at the scene of the incident and it was felt that they were not affected by the event.

A number of years ago, I was called in to help with a crisis that had occurred within the northern zone of the Pittsburgh call center. On the northern zone’s weekend off, the team’s group leader/mentor was along with his wife killed in a tragic car crash. The crew members were unaware of the incident until reporting to work. The whole crew was impacted by the event and unable to safely work on the screens. The Chief Administrative Officer for Allegheny County requested immediate help from Pittsburgh’s CISM team. I was available and I went in to assess the need and give them what I was trained in regarding crisis intervention. I was able to educate them with regard to the possible effects of a critical incident but I also became aware that more was needed, to possibly find immediate relief.  I made the choice to integrate TFT into the crisis intervention work. I was able to stabilize thirteen dispatchers through one on ones and combinations in four hours which permitted them to safely return to work supporting the city of Pittsburgh. I immediately became the Chief’s designated 911 Center CISM representative ever since.

Over the years we were seeing positive results of what was being done to help the dispatchers; the Shift Commanders and the EMS manager would call me in to help with the top critical incidents affecting the call center.   Not only was the technique I had developed effective, it was trusted by the dispatchers in the call center. I became the CISM man and was now working with Westmoreland County Call Center along with Allegheny County Call Center.  I would only go in when the call center needing help would called the Stat Command Center requesting help from the CISM team.

This past year I had been called into work with four major critical incidents the –worst of the worst–. Two calls occurring in Westmoreland County were the Line Duty Deaths of a Police officer, where the wife of one of the fallen officers worked in the call center as a dispatcher. The two calls in Allegheny County also were the– worst of the worst– with the suicide of a call center dispatcher which was heard over the 911 call, and the sudden death of a twenty year trainer who had impacted so many dispatchers in their journey.

I worked successfully with over forty seven dispatchers on a one on one basis at the scene as the event was going on, generally within an hour of the critical incident. I realized that the crisis intervention procedure that I had developed which is integrated with TFT is quick, effective and repeatable. These individuals came to see me affected by the critical incident but other things unique and unexplainable to them was coming up, they we’re not ready to talk about it, let alone ready to tap on it.

I generally saw the individual who was visibly impacted by the event first. If they we’re able to find some relief and if they were comfortable and trusted me another would come to see me. All my work is done on a voluntary basis and no one is forced to talk with me. I generally spent anywhere from fifteen minutes to an hour with the individuals when I spoke with them; and I had no previous information about them prior to our meeting. I am usually located in an area where they can come in to see me with privacy. As one individual would go back to the call center another would come in to see me. With a major event I am usually there eight to sixteen hours. I will then come back in eight to twelve hours to see if I missed anyone or if they wanted to meet with me again.

How I know that this technique is working is a couple of ways. The dispatchers are seeking me out because of word of mouth from the experience of other dispatchers, they trust me. I have been having the individuals at the upper management positions acknowledging and writing about the positive effects and the effectiveness in the call centers while going through the worst crisis. A seasoned and senior Shift Commander put it this way “I am watching the dispatchers walking in to see you being very distraught and beaten but when they come back they are visibly relieved and are able to go back on the screens.”

I am currently on a state wide task force to deal with the increasing problem of suicide with public safety individuals and I am one person’s approval away from putting in a pilot program with one of the largest drug and alcohol treatment programs in the country using these techniques.

For the readers who don’t know me I am neither a public safety first responder nor am I a licensed mental health therapist. I am a veteran and a trained peer with Pittsburgh’s CISM team for over twenty years, I have close to thirty years in recovery and I am a person who cares and is willing to do the work necessary to make a difference.

Jim Mc Aninch, TFT-ADV, TFT-RCT
Crisis Wellness LLC
www.crisiswellness.com
Jim@crisiswellness.com

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Chile Fires 2014

Chile Fires 2014

by Mariela Prada, TFT-Adv

As you may know Chile is a country where natural disasters happen every now and then. Thus most people are always willing to help and to assist those in needs when something happens, each one doing its best according to experience and knowledge.

In March we had a “minor” earthquake (7.0) in the northern region (Iquique, a port in the north of Chile) , which was not so harmful but left people in a state of unease and expectation to what might be coming next. On April 1 a much bigger earthquake (8.3) hit the same region at 8 pm.   Fortunately most were already at home with their families , which was a very positive. The first reaction people have with these events is to desperately know if their relatives are ok.

It is also important to know that for many weeks there were important aftershocks which kept people under continuous stress . Some did not want to sleep in their homes for fear it would hit again at night, and many wanted to stay in the surrounding hills, as after earthquakes there is always the danger of a tsunami afterwards.  The memory of what happened in March 2010 (earthquake plus sumani).

In these cases, the best way to help is to do it through a local organization.   A group of TFT therapist were eager to help, so we got in contact with a mining company who was organizing psychological help for people affected by this earthquake. One of the volunteers was somebody who has done the Algorithm course and lives in Iquique.

The team traveled to Iquique twice for one week. Most of the times they worked with a whole group (algorithm for the trauma plus emotions), the only way to give help in larger number. And in some cases , they did individual sessions (using mostly diagnostics).

The work involved the trauma (s) of the situation, plus the anxiety of what the next one to come, as earthquake specialist were saying that not all of the pressure had been released , which means that there must be another one in a near future.   This caused a lot of anxiety in all of the people treated, and mainly those who had to drive up to the mines, which means taking a winding road that may be very dangerous during an important earth movement. Thus we also had to address this anxiety and give them tools to do tapping on their own while driving up the road or whenever they felt uneasy or afraid.

While we were doing these interventions, we had another big disaster on April 23. In Valparaiso, a hilly town near the sea there was a huge fire that burned down 2.900 homes affecting 12.500 people, all of them of very low means of income. The fire was extinguished only after a week; the town was covered in smoke, the houses burned to ashes, people living in shelters, stray dogs and cats in need of food….

Local authorities asked to concentrate all help through organizations working in Valparaíso so as to limit the number of people coming to the city. In this case we worked through the School of Psychologist, who had the necessary contacts to go and work with the people, mainly in shelters.

In this case the traumas were not only the one of the fire but also that of losing all their belongings, all their “treasures” (pictures, family items, etc)., the uncertainty of the future (the local government is rebuilding those homes but that takes time), children who had lost their pets, whose school had burned down, plus the daily problems that rise when living in shelters with many other families.

As you can see, it is a multitraumatic situation. In this case, what we mostly did was train volunteers to work with the appropriate algorithm. This work is still being done; volunteers mainly work on week-ends. They have also been trained to teach parents algorithms to have tools to help their children. This empowers them and gives them tools they can use with others.

Once again, TFT has proved to be a wonderful tool to help people in need, help them get over their traumas, to do tapping with their children, to get back the energy to address their daily routines, help them have faith in the future.

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Since the year 2004, 10 years after the Rwanda genocide took place, April 7 has become an annual Day of Remembrance of the Victims of the Rwanda Genocide. The commemoration actually lasts the entire month of April and commemorates the deaths of 800,000 people who were murdered during the 1994 genocide. Celestin Mitabu is a TFT practitioner and trainer who is dedicated to relieving the suffering of his fellow Rwandans. The video above is a synopsis of how he and others helped heal trauma with TFT during the 2014 commemoration, the 20th anniversary of the genocide.

Following is a further description:

By Celestin Mitabu, TFT Trainer, Greats Lakes, Rwanda:

During the first week of the commemoration on 7th 4/2014 we send our team to Amahoro National Stadium to help people. Many of our therapist that served at Amahoro stadium are University Students survivals of the Genocide known as ARG. TFT–Have trained many of the ARG students and we have been working well with them and they are very committed to help people during this time.

We have a total number of 184 TFT therapists who helped people during this period of commemoration, and they have been giving me daily reports after every treatment. I have received many encouraging reports from practitioners….We are planning to have a common meeting at the end of the commemoration which will include all 184 therapists and we will hear testimonies because they treated many people and they have different testimonies. Some told me that after treatment some of the clients asked them contacts so that they will meet another time which to me is very good.

Sandrine told me that when she was treating some one in Nyamirambo Stadium there came a Medical Doctor working with the Ministry of Health he is an Egyptian man he was like confused while watching Sandrine practicing TFT until he told her to leave the client alone, but Nancy, who is in charge of Mental Health at the Ministry of Health, told Sandrine to continue and the results was positif at the end.

Last year during the commemoration, TFT started at the grass root level (Villages, Cells, Sectors, and Districts), but this year we started at the National level (National Stadium of Amahoro, Regional Stadium of Nyamirambo, and famer site of Nyanz Kicukiro among others). Last year, because we started at the lower level wherever we went, TFT controlled the treatment, but this year, because we started from the top and were mixed with different teams (Medical Doctors, Mental Health agent, different Humanitarian Organizations: Ibuka, CNLG, Haguruka, etc.), we all worked under the control and protocol  of the Ministry of Health. That is why, before starting to get involved in the treatments at the top level, we applied to the Ministry in charge and CNLG for recognition. And we did the TFT Campaign ahead of the treatment, and the campaign was taken to the Universities where you find people that are in charge of the Humanitarian work/helping.

Another great thing that we did during this first commemoration week is that  I taught TFT to two different Rwanda Community Radios: Musanze/Ruhengeri Community Radio and Rubavu/Gisenyi community Radio. Each Radio station gave me one hour and fifteen minutes. The topic was Trauma Control. At Musanze, I was interviewed by a journalist first to tell the listeners what TFT means and how it came about. Then how we do our activities and what are the results. Then I taught the Trauma Algorithm. I told them about the Major treatments of trauma, the 9G , 2 reversals, and how to set the SUD. Our listeners called us asking questions for help. They are still calling. At the end of the teaching, the chief Editor requested if we can have a permanent teaching on the Radio, saying the teachings are very relevant and appropriate to the event.

From Musanze/Ruhengeri we went to Rubavu, which is a different District, and we had the same teachings and the same methodologies, but we were interviewed by the Chef Editor and another Journalist. After teaching we were asked more questions by the Journalist and listeners–more than the first interview. At the end, the Chef Editor said to us it would be good for every village in Rwanda to have at least two therapist trained in TFT.

To us this is a great achievement, to spend 2hrs and 30 minutes teaching TFT on different Radio stations and have million(s) listening to us, especially that the teachings took place at 5:00 and 8:00, when everybody is at home after work relaxing.

Some of the pictures taken from the studio, it as still day time but the second teachings at Rubavu /Ruhengeri it was night and pictures are dork but the journalist who is working for our documentary told me that he will add light to those night pictures.

 

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journalphotoTHOUGHT FIELD THERAPY EFFICACY FOLLOWING LARGE SCALE TRAUMATIC EVENTS

Ann L. Dunnewold

Abstract

Thought Field Therapy Efficacy Following Large Scale Traumatic Events: Description of Four Studies Thought Field Therapy (TFT) has been shown to reduce symptoms of Posttraumatic Stress (PTS) with trauma survivors in four studies in Africa.

In a 2006 preliminary study, orphaned Rwandan adolescents, who reported ongoing trauma symptoms since the 1994 genocide, were treated with TFT. A 2008 Randomized Controlled Trial (RCT) examined the efficacy of TFT treatments facilitated by Rwandan Community leaders in reducing PTS symptoms in adult survivors of the 1994 genocide.

Results of the 2008 study were replicated in a second RCT in Rwanda in 2009. A fourth RCT in Uganda (in preparation for submission) demonstrated significant differences in a third community leader-administered TFT treatment. The studies described here suggest that one-time, community leader-facilitated TFT interventions may be beneficial with protracted PTS in genocide survivors.

To view the full article from Science Publications, click here

Cite this Article: Dunnewold, A.L., 2014. Thought field therapy efficacy following large scale traumatic events. Curr. Res. Psychol., 5: 34-39.

excerpted from Science Publications, Current Research in Psychology. Volume 5, Issue 1

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Figure 1. A representation of the medical model conceptualisation of the relationship between “symptoms” and “treatment.”

Figure 1. A representation of the medical model conceptualisation of the relationship between “symptoms” and “treatment.”

Thought Field Therapy – The missing link to effective trauma-informed care and practice

By Christopher Semmens Clinical Psychologist Perth, Western Australia

All truth passes through three stages. First, it is ridiculed. Second, it is violently opposed. Third, it is accepted as being self-evident. Arthur Schopenhauer

There is nothing more difficult to take in hand, more perilous to conduct, or more uncertain in its success, than to take the lead in the introduction of a new order of things. Niccolo Machiavlli

Trauma- informed care and practice is a framework for the provision of services for mental health clients that originated in the early 1990s and has especially been put forth as a sensible service model since Harris and Fallot’s 2001 publication Using trauma theory to design service systems. Trauma-informed care can be seen to be characterised by three main considerations in regard to the provision of treatment services:

  1. That they incorporate a recognition of the reality that there is a high incidence of traumatic stress in those presenting for mental health care services.
  2. That a comprehensive understanding of the significant psychological, neurological, biological and social manifestation of traumatic and violent experiences can have on a person.
  3. That the care provided to these clients in recognising these effects is collaborative, skill-based and supportive.

In Australia these ideas were the focus of a consciousness raising conference: Trauma-Informed Care and Practice: Meeting the Challenge conducted by the Mental Health Coordinating Council in Sydney in June 2011. The conference was part of an initiative towards a national agenda to promote the philosophy of trauma-informed care to be integrated into practice across service systems throughout Australia.

It has only really been since studies such as (more…)

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UgandaMission2013_05_14Ugandan TFT Mission: January 12 – 27, 2014

By Roger Ludwig*

Mists of mosquito netting drape around me as I type, cross-legged, on my bed. Beyond are cracked walls and doors ajar. Any effort to make and keep parallel lines in Africa is usually ephemeral. But to do that, in the form of a well ordered scientific study of Thought Field Therapy’s effectiveness, we have come, in addition to training many people and treating dozens of others.

Beyond this room, in the haze of heat, humidity and dust, are now familiar sounds. Children shout, men laugh. There is the loud cawing of ravens, relentless hoopoe of grey doves, and the distant, throbbing hum of the hulking cement factory which towers over this gritty town of Hima. It brings meager paychecks to workers who come from all over Uganda with their separate languages and appearances. They toil in hope of better lives for their wives and children. Our sweat is small in comparison but our dreams are similar for these Ugandan peoples we have come to love.

The work of our mission is now finished, ending, as it began, in fatigue. I arrived two weeks ago at 3:15 am, a smooth landing in Entebbe, grabbed bags and passed customs to see the ever hospitable Fr. Peter waiting to “most welcome” me. It is my third trip to Uganda. Fr. Peter’s musical laugh and loving heart is a tonic, to me and to hundreds of others.

Our Volunteer Team

After two hours’ sleep in a guest house I meet the team at breakfast. Dr. Howard Robson and his wife Phyll are here from England. They have recently retired, he from his cardiology practice, she from nursing. We have worked together on both prior Ugandan trips. It is great to see them.

One of our most important goals is to add to the 2012 study. At that time we trained volunteer TFT counselors, who pre-tested, then treated 256 people who came admitting symptoms of PTSD. A week later they were post-tested. It was a wait-list controlled effort that involved hundreds of people. Dr. Howard directed the study and has taken charge, in his relaxed manner, of this one. We hope to bring many of those 256 back, now 18 months later, for post testing. How have they fared after their brief treatment? (more…)

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DrivingFear

stock photo

Monika D’Agate, London, UK, driving instructor and TFT therapist, shares the following example of the profound healing taking place with her students through TFT:

Let’s talk about Jane

Jane was a young woman in her thirties, who 10 years prior was involved in a collision with a car, riding a motorcycle. A few years later, when she had the courage to take up car driving lessons, all seemed fine until reading Richard Hammonds book about his high speed crash. She read a paragraph that described his recovery and very painful stomach injections. The very same ones she had been given many years prior.

At that point her driving lessons had become impossible, the more anxious she had become, the more annoyed her instructor got. She developed a driving phobia. When she came to take her first driving lesson with me, she could not sit in the driving seat.

In panic, her face was white and her palms were sweating. It only took one tapping session, and she overcame the initial fear, which then was followed with 1.5 hour driving lesson.

Whilst teaching her to drive, I uncovered other self-esteem issues, which we had to deal with on subsequent lessons. TFT combined with driver training had given her chance to achieve one of her dreams – driving, as well as help her overcome other emotional issues that were not driving related.

Being a TFT therapist is about helping everyone on day to day issues, so they can move on and deal with things in a rational instead of an emotionally negative way.

Excerpted from “Tapping for Humanity”, Spring, 2013

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